Cape May bed and breakfast Gingerbread for Donna B.

Recently one of our guests at Leith Hall b&b contacted me to requestLeith Hall Cape May bed and breakfast gingerbread two recipes we serve at afternoon tea. This one, Leith Hall’s Cape May bed and breakfast Gingerbread, is for Donna. It has bits of crystallized ginger in it for an extra sharp bite. Sometimes I ice it with a bittersweet chocolate and butter icing (which I’ll put on almost anything) and sometimes I’ll sprinkle it with confectioner’s sugar through a paper doily laid on top of the gingerbread. We always have one chocolate and one non-chocolate treat at teatime. Suzie would never forgive me if I left out the chocolate, and we sometimes have guests who (sadly) don’t like chocolate.

Leith Hall Cape May bed and breakfast Gingerbread

1/2 cup white sugar

1/2 cup butter

1 egg

1 cup molasses

2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

1 1/2 teaspoons baking soda

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1 teaspoon ground ginger

½ cup crystallized ginger, cut into tiny slicescrystallized ginger for Leith Hall Cape May bed and breakfast gingerbread

 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves

 1/2 teaspoon salt

 1 cup hot water

 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F   Line a 9 “square pan with cooking parchment and spray with cooking spray

In an electric mixer, cream together the sugar and butter. Beat in the egg, and mix in the molasses.

In a bowl, mix together the flour, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, ginger, and cloves. Beat into the creamed mixture. Stir in the hot water. Pour into the prepared pan.

Bake 1 hour in the preheated oven, until the gingerbread springs back when prodded with a fingertip. Allow to cool in pan before serving.

Cape May bed and breakfastDid you know that wooden house trim is called gingerbread because gingerbread was once very heavily decorated? During the Middle Ages, ginger was fabulously expensive and gingerbread was a desert at Royal and Noble courts. Sometimes, it was ornamented with real gold leaf in elaborate swirls. When sawn wooden ornament was introduced in the nineteenth century, people started calling it gingerbread because it reminded them of Christmas gingerbread houses – which are the last vestige of great medieval gingerbread constructions. Architecture and dessert all in one, my favorite combination