Paintings by Elan Zingman-Leith for Sale

Artist’s Statement and How to Buy a Painting

Each image of this part of the Leith Hall website is a painting.  The medium of each painting, the size, and the price are at the bottom of each description.

To buy a painting, either contact the artist at   elansuze@comcast.net or by phone at 609 742-5319. You can buy a painting with cash, check, or credit card. The paintings can be picked up in Cape May, New Jersey, or delivered by your art shipper, or sent by UPS (with plywood and bubble-wrap) at the buyer’s expense. You can return any painting within thirty days for a full refund, minus shipping costs.

Elan Zingman-Leith, painter

Elan Zingman-Leith is an artist who has been painting in oils since 1958 when he was seven years old. He’s had many years of training and has sold paintings in New York. He and his wife, Susan, moved to Cape May, New Jersey, in 1989 to own and operate Leith Hall, a restored Victorian bed and breakfast. They spend winters around the Mediterranean and have written a guidebook to Rome (called “Rome Secrets”, available on Amazon).  Elan’s interests include architecture and history which shows in his paintings.

Elan mostly paints landscapes and city-scapes with special interest in the effects of light and weather. His locations include Cape May, where he and Susan live, and many places around the Mediterranean where they travel every year. His style is traditional with the color of the Impressionists, but seldom the broken brushstrokes. Elan has had gallery shows of his paintings in Philadelphia and Cape May and has a website, www.elanzingmanleith-artist.com.

Elan has been Deputy Director of the NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission, president of NY Preservation Specialists, chair of the Cape May and the West Cape May Historic Preservation Commissions, trustee and president of the New Jersey Historic Trust, trustee and president of the Mid-Atlantic Center for the Arts, and curator of the Emlen Physick Estate in Cape May.

 

The Alhambra Granada Spain

Alhambra Granada Spain

To many, the Alhambra in Granada is the most beautiful building in the world. Instead of making its effect by making the rooms and the elements of the building larger and more bombastic, like a Baroque palace, it makes its point by making the building more complex. In the same way that Gothic cathedrals expressed their religious feeling by being taller and bigger, the Alhambra expresses its view of magnificence my multiplying the number of courtyards, of pools, of rooms, and of patterns. It is amazingly complicated.

In this painting the light from the courtyard spills ont the wet marble floor and makes a reflection of the copper doors. The arches and the person are silhouetted against the shine. The man in the burnoose is Rashid Lamrani, who was our guide in Morocco. He is a very modern young man, but one day his friends dressed him up in a burnoose, and he immediately looked very exotic. He appears to be looking down at something very important, but, in fact, was checking his cellphone. I moved him from Morocco to this painting of Spain, because I wanted a traditional looking figure in the painting.

Oil on canvas
24”w x 36”h

$2,400.

 

 

Todra Gorge,Morocco

 

Todra Gorge Morocco

This is a gorge in southern Morocco, with brilliant sun throwing half of the canyon into shadow. The tiny figure on the camel is Susan, who insists that the painting should be Portrait of Susan with Todra Gorge. The colors of the stone in sun, in shadow and in the distance were so distinctive that I just painted them as they were – no drama added. Our visit to Todra Gorge was part of a three day jaunt down into the Sahara, guided by Rashid Lamrani, who appears in my painting of the Alhambra.

Oil on canvas
36”w x 24”h

$2,400.

 

The Senate in the ForumRoman Forum

 

Susan and I were hobbling back after a long day of walking around Rome. We walked along the Via dei Fori Imperiali looking for a bus. I looked right and saw the back of the Roman Senate in the forum right next to the baroque Chiesa di Santi Martina e Luca. The simple brick Senate building (the Curia) next to the elaborate church made a wonderful contrast between ancient Rome and counter-reformation Rome; and the pruned Roman pines made the whole scene much more graphically interesting.

Oil on canvas
36”w x 24”h

$2,400.

 

 

The Canal de la Robine near Narbonne in France

Canal de la Robine Narbonne France

This is the Canal de la Robine in the Languedoc-Rousillon region of France. In Narbonne, the canal is very densely built-up and urban, but just outside, it is very quiet.

My aim here was to capture the morning light shining through the February leaves. The oil paint is used very thinly, almost like watercolor to get a luminous effect.

36”w x 24” h
Oil on canvas

$2,400.

 

The Arch of Titus in the Roman Forum

 

Arch of Titus Roman Forum

 

This is the Roman Forum as seen from the tabularium, which is the taller building at the Northern end of the forum. The triumphal arch at the South end of the Forum is the Arch of Titus, which was erected to celebrate the defeat of the Judeans and the looting of Jerusalem. From this view, the mass of the forum is a chaotic confusion of masonry and trees, with only the Arch of Titus clearly seen in the distance.

My aim was to capture the confusion of the middle ground and the clear white shape of the Arch of Titus. The stacked perspective is more like a medieval painting than like a modern one.

Oil on canvas
24”w x 36”h

$2,400.

 

The Ponte Romana Tavira Portugal

Ponte Romana Tavira Portugal

 

Susan and I have stayed in Tavira on the southern coast of Portugal several times. It is one of the few towns in the Algarve that is not just a beach resort, but a picturesque place separate from the beach. This is the old Roman bridge which spans the inlet that serves the town, as seen reflecting in the still waters.
In this painting, I tried to capture the bleached white houses on the opposite shore, which look almost North African, and the beautiful arches of the bridge and their reflections.

Oil on canvas
36”w x 24”h

$2,400.

 

Olive Grove Beja Portugal 1


Olive Grove Beja Portugal 1

 

This is one of a pair of paintings of the olive grove on the grounds of the castle in Beja, Portugal. In this painting, the trees are painted as masses of light and shadow, and some leaves are added afterward to create the impression of leafiness. The other is painted differently.

Oil on canvas

20”w x 16”h

$900

 

Olive Grove Beja Portugal 2


Olive Grove Beja Portugal 2

 

This is one of a pair of paintings of the olive grove on the grounds of the castle in Beja, Portugal. In this painting, the trees are painted as hundreds of individual leaves, rather than the usual way of treating the whole leaf-mass as one volume with light and shadow. The other painting of this pair is painted differently.

Oil on canvas

20”w x 16”h

$900

 

Siena from the Loggia of the Palazzo Publico


Siena Loggia of the Palazzo Publico

 

Siena is one of the most beautiful places I’ve ever seen. It is composed of a series of ring shaped streets on a hilltop, with terra cotta and yellow ochre walls and roofs everywhere. It was one of the great competitors to Florence in the Middle Ages, and still has a gracious Medieval appearance composed of wonderful architecture and lots of money. This is the view from the town-hall tower on the Campo in the center of town. I’ll only go to this level, near the bottom of the tower because I’m afraid of heights.

In this painting, I tried to capture the complexity of the hundreds of planes and variety of terra cottas, all seen in the brilliant Tuscan sun. I used lots of linseed oil in the paint to get a fat, rich paint that would carry the intensity of the colors. I also painted it on a large canvas to show off the view.

30”w x 40” h

$2,700

 

Santa Maria della Salute Venice, Italy

 

Santa Maria Della Salute Venice

 

This is a view of the Santa Maria della Salute from the Riva degli Schiavoni in Venice, Italy, during Carnival. Susan always wanted to go to Carnivale in Venice, and one year, Easter was very early, so we could arrange Carnival in our schedule. We were staying in a hotel right on the Riva degli Schiavoni, recommended by a friend and neighbor in Cape May. Every morning, we’d go walking in our costumes, attracting lots of attention and having hundreds of Japanese tourists take their pictures with us. I went as a giant Turk and Susan went as an eighteenth century Frenchwoman.
My aim in this painting was to convey the crush of the crowd on the Riva degli Schiavoni and the other-worldliness of the pink light shining on the dome of the Salute. I used much more linseed oil than usual to make a rich, fat paint to carry intense color.
36”w x 24” h
Oil on canvas

$2,400

 

The Castle of Beja Alentejo Portugal

 

Beja Castle Portugal

 

Beja is the second city of the Portuguese region of the Alentejo. It features the Torre de Menagem, which is a Roman castle, rebuilt in the Middle Ages. We usually stay in Evora, the primary city of the Alentejo, but one year tried Beja for variety’s sake. The Alentejo is very pretty and has the best food in Portugal.

Oil on canvas

36”w x 24” h

$2,400

 

 

San Andrea delle Valle Rome Italy

San Andrea delle Valle Rome

 

This was the view from our window when we used to stay at the Hotel Pantaleone in Rome. The hotel was in a palazzo, but is gone now, and we rent our own apartment. We were on the top floor, in the cornice. If I leaned out the window, I could see the Chiesa de San Andrea delle Valle. It is one of the most spectacular Baroque churches in Rome, and therefore in the world. I think it’s great in the ‘smack you between the eyes’ way that Roman counter-reformation churches were. Looking down at the street, we could see the late afternoon sunlight and the gathering storm.

Oil on canvas

24”w x 30”h

$1,100.

 

Mdina Gozo Malta

 

Mdina Gozo Malta

 

Susan and I spent a month in Malta many years ago. We were visiting the smaller island of Gozo, on the way to the old capital, Mdina. While we were in the sun at the bottom of the hill, it was showering in the city. When we got to the city gates, we were drenched. Every inch of Malta is terraced and farmed and not a spot is wasted.

My aim was to capture the drama of the medieval city on a hill with the terraced gardens flanking the slope. The dramatic cloud was a bonus.

oil on canvas

36″w x 24″h

$2,400.

 

Cloud at Ocean Street Beach


Cloud at Ocean Street Beach Cape May

 

This was a giant solid cloud that appeared over the beach one day in autumn, only fifty yards from Leith Hall, at the foot of Ocean Street. Crowds gathered to look up at it and I thought that it would make a great painting of weather.

It’s painted very solidly, with thick paint, as the cloud was not the usual wispy, insubstantial thing, but a big heavy mass.

Oil on canvas
30”w x 24”h

$2,400.

 

Jardins de la Fontaine Nimes France

Jardins de la Fontaine Nimes France

 

Nimes is a beautiful city in southern France. It has two world famous sites; the Vieux Carré, which is the most perfectly preserved Roman temple in the world, and the Arena, which is a Roman coliseum. We were wandering around the city, catching its other sites, and climbed through a park called the Jardins de la Fontaine. About halfway up to hill, I saw this scene, which seemed so quintessentially French, that I had to paint it.

My aim was to capture the long shadows creating violet stripes across the path and the Frenchness of the pink stucco house

Oil on canvas
28”w x 22”h

$1,100.

 

Fifty-second Street at Night New York


Fifty-second street at Night New York

 

Susan and I were in Manhattan to see a play at the invitation of our friends and neighbors, the Krebs’s. We were going in to dinner at The Iron Bar, when I saw this scene. It was a drizzly, misty night and the street lights lit up the fog from below. The street level was bright with glare and the nineteenth century buildings were shining with reflected light. The newer towers in the neighborhood loomed in the background against the inky sky.

This scene made me very homesick and I wanted to capture the liveliness of the scene and the wild contrasts of the evening on 52nd Street near Times Square. It’s a large painting to reflect the large scene.

Oil on canvas
36”w x 48”h

$2,700.

 

Trajan’s Column near the Roman Forum

Trajans Column Rome Forum

 

Trajan’s Column was built in 113 A.D. at the edge of the Roman Forum to commemorate the Emperor Trajan’s victories over the Dacians in what is now Romania and its neighbors. What is so amazing is that it is still there, in the same place, looking much like it did two thousand years ago. It is the model for every memorial column put up ever since. A pope put a statue of Saint Peter on the top in the sixteenth century, but that didn’t have much effect. Susan and I were just returning from lunch in the café at the top of the Vittoriano, when we saw this scene from the front steps. It had rained several times that day and was about to pour again. The dark clouds that were coming out of the East were moving very fast.

Oil on canvas
24”w x 36”h

$2,400.

Canal de la Robine Narbonne France

Canal de la Robine Narbonne France

 

This is the Canal de la Robine in the city of Narbonne, France. When the Canal du Midi was built by Louis XIV, the businessmen of Narbonne realized that it didn’t pass through the city and that their town would wither and die. So, they built a canal to connect to the new Canal du Midi. The bridge over the canal is the only bridge in France that is covered by buildings; and the city is a picturesque one with great public spaces.
My aim was to capture the mirror-like canal and the intense blue of the sky in the South of France, even on this winter day.

Oil on canvas
18”w x 24”h

$900.

 

Cape May Wetlands

Cape May Wetlands

 

This is a small painting that I did years ago of the Cape May wetlands between Wildwood and the mainland of New Jersey. The mud flats in the foreground were next to Ocean Drive and the bunch of trees on the horizon are adjacent to the banks along route 47.

I put the horizon very high to try to capture the vastness and flatness of the wetlands in a small canvas. The color is laid on in washes to reproduce the beige and green of early spring.

oil on canvas

$900.

 

Canal Boats in Narbonne France

Canal Boats Narbonne France

 

This is the Canal de la Robine, which I have painted in other views. Here, right in the middle of Narbonne, the canal boats were moored along the banks, and the low winter sun made long shadows. The French love to torture trees into artificial shapes and the plane trees in Narbonne are the same as those in Cap May, New Jersey, but trimmed into urban decorations.

Oil on canvas

28”w x 22”h

$900.

 

Carcassonne France


Carcassonne France

 

Carcassonne is a castle town on a hill in southwestern France. In the 1200s, the Pope and the king of France agreed to conquer this part of France. The locals were Langue d’Oc speaking Cathars. The Pope declared Cathars to be heretics and the French and Papal forces killed millions of Frenchmen. France got vast new territories and the Pope got to kill off millions who wouldn’t accept his authority. The fortified city of Carcassonne still survives from that period.
This is one of two small paintings of Carcassonne. I was trying to capture the otherworldly, medieval look if the town in late February.

Oil on canvas
16” x 20”

$900.

 

The Aude River at Carcassonne France

Aude River Carcassonne France

 

Carcassonne is a castle town in southwestern France. In the 1200s, the Pope and the king of France massacred millions of Frenchmen in this area in the Albigensian Crusade. Though the history is terrible, Carcassonne is beautiful and like a fairyland version of the Middle Ages.
This is one of two small paintings of Carcassonne. I was trying to capture the otherworldly, medieval look of the town in late February.

Oil on canvas
16” x 20”

$900.

 

Nocturne in Blue Our Lady Star of the Sea Cape May

Nocturne in Blue Our Lady Star of the Sea Cape May

 

I had to visit the Acme supermarket early one winter morning to get eggs for the bed and breakfast. When I came out, I noticed the dark mass of Our Lady Star of the Sea across the parking lot. The pavement was wet and the dawn was dark and misty.
The scene reminded me of James McNeil Whistlers’ Nocturnes, especially those of the Houses of Parliament. He used to say he used his “special sauce” to get the liquid night effect. I guessed that his “special sauce” is glaze made of linseed oil and ultramarine blue – which is what I used.

Oil on canvas
20”w x 16”h

$900.

 

Temple of Diana in the Pincio Park, Rome

Temple of Diana Pincio Park Rome

 

The Pincio Park, or the gardens of the Villa Borghese, are the Rome equivalent of New York’s Central Park. We’d often sit in our favorite café in the park to write Rome Secrets or CityTravelBlog. This is the Temple of Diana in the park in the sun, with several picnickers on the lawn in the foreground in dappled shade.

I was interested in capturing the subject in bright light in the background, as it so often is in 18th and 19th century landscapes. The middle ground is alternately sunny and shaded, and the silhouetted tree in the foreground gives the composition depth and drama in a somewhat Japanese way. I often like a tree in the foreground as a way of dividing the canvas and giving drama to an otherwise calm landscape.

Oil on canvas

36”w x 24”h

$1,200.

 

Beach at Cape May

Beach Cape May

 

This is the view from the beach, fifty yards from Leith Hall in Cape May, at the foot of Ocean Street. The day was roiling with clouds and I wanted to capture the dramatic shapes. The clouds are unusually solid as they were that day.

Oil on canvas
36”w x 24”h

$2,400.

 

Cape May Threatened

Cape May Threatened

 

Susan and I were just starting up the Garden State Parkway when I looked over at the wetlands/ back bay/ marsh that separates Wildwood and the mainland of New Jersey. The sky was beautiful and blue and the wetlands were that winter beige color; but there was one enormous cloud hanging over the earth, isolated and threatening.

My aim was to capture the enormous, flat landscape of the Cape May salt marshes and the strange single rain cloud. This is the largest painting that I’ve done in a few years.

5’w x 3’h
Oil on canvas

$3,300.

 

On the Palatine Hill in Rome

Palatine Hill Rome

 

The Palatine Hill is adjacent to the Roman Forum and is where the greats of ancient Rome built their palaces. The word palace actually comes from the name of the hill. Now, two thousand years later, it is a honeycomb of rooms in ruins with cave-like holes where the original outside walls were. A few rooms have survived and can be visited to see the wall paintings and the arrangements, but overall it is quite spooky.

The freestanding ruins and the medieval houses that were built out of the salvage are very vertical and very impressive. Susan is peeking over the wall, and a Chinese girl and her boyfriend with droopy trousers are in the foreground.

Oil on canvas
24”w x 36”h

$2,400.

 

Bob Heinley as Dr. Physick Cape May

Dr. Physick Cape May Bob Heinly

 

Bob Heinley often plays the character of Dr. Emlyn Physick in the town that I live in, Cape May, New Jersey. He was sitting on a rustic bench at the Physick Estate, waiting for his next tour group, when he was photographed in this pose. He’s waiting in front of viburnums and had a perfect, twisty, Mannerist pose.

Oil on canvas
36”w x 24”h

$2,400.